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Phlebotomy Basics For Nurses

Mary H. Nielson, DNP, APRN-BC

nielsonm@att.net

The processes of phlebotomy are pivotal for patient care. Nurses may have to perform phlebotomy for their patient in various health care settings. Understanding the procedures, processes and reasons behind phlebotomy is the key to ensuring patient safety and positive patient outcomes. Cont'd

Recognizing Heart Disease As a Women's Disease

Maureen Kroning RN EdD Associate Professor of Nursing at Nyack College School of Nursing

maureen.kroning@nyack.edu

There are noted differences among heart disease signs between men and women. Coronary Heart Disease can go unnoticed in women until they actually suffer a heart attack (NIH). Thus it is essential women are aware of the signs and symptoms, risk factors and healthy life style choices to prevent the devastating effects of heart disease. .Seeking early treatment when symptoms present is vital in improving the outcome of heart disease. It is important to teach women how to incorporate prevention strategies such as: consuming a healthy diet, maintaining optimum weight, maintaining an active lifestyle, maintaining both normal blood sugar and blood pressure levels as well as avoiding risk factors such as smoking, drinking alcohol limit their stress and any unhealthy behaviors that can lead to heart disease. Advocating for women and promoting education regarding health issues affecting women needs to be a priority so heart disease in women can be prevented and effectively treated. Cont'd

If You Work in a Hospital

Jim Owen, MAT, retired EAP Counselor and Regional Manager for Workforce Performance Solutions. I provided EAP and Consulting services to multiple health care institutions and their staff in Northern and Eastern Maine. WPS is headquartered in Portland, Maine, and is a division of Affiliated Healthcare Systems, Bangor, Maine.

jowenbelfastme@gmail.com

I have been retired almost 3 years. Since retiring, I have been writing poetry instead of clinical records, reports, and contract proposals. Some of my poetry is about work. This poem reflects my experience working with nurses and doctors. I appreciate that poetry is not something you usually publish, however, like a photo, a poem is sometimes worth a thousand words. I think this poem is particularly relevant to the nurses who read your magazine, it has to do with bad days at work, and high expectations regarding patient outcomes. Cont'd

The Future of Nursing Education: Heading for a Major Crisis

Rebecca E. Przywara, BSN Student Nyack College, NY & Maureen Kroning RN EdD, Associate Professor at Nyack College, NY

maureen.kroning@nyack.edu

Nursing as a practice and profession has experienced significant changes over the years. For instance, in the 1800s nurses were expected to be subservient to doctors. Just hear what the doctor who gave Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduation address: "Every nurse must remember that it is the attending physician's business to make a diagnosis of disease and hence that she should never hazard an opinion herself, under any circumstances." (Dr. Hooker, Springfield Hospital Annual Report, 1894). It would be interesting to know what the nursing faculty were thinking when they heard those words. Thankfully nurses during that era did not take the doctor’s advice and remained dedicated to advance and advocate for the profession of nursing. Around the same time that Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduating class were listening to their graduation address, Florence Nightingale along with other nurse advocates, were making incredible strides to implement nursing education. After the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale recognized and introduced the need for formal nursing education but the education was limited to basic nursing knowledge and skills. As a result of the Women’s Rights Movement in the 1900s, the idea of nursing as a profession evolved into a reality. As society’s healthcare needs changed, nursing education had to change to meet those needs. There were however, challenges each century faced when trying to ensure nursing education met society’s needs and today, the challenges faced are heading right for a major crisis. Cont'd

Disparities in Healthcare: Night Shift Nurses

Skip Morelock PhD, RN, NEA-BC

skpgmor@aol.com

Night shift nurses have been shown more likely to developing health issues than their day shift counterparts. Research over the past twenty years has led to the increasing conclusion that working night shifts for as little as eight shifts a month is associated with an increased likelihood to develop metabolic syndrome, a four-fold increase in the incidence of vascular events, and an increased chanceofdeveloping certain cancers. Cont'd

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