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The Future of Nursing Education: Heading for a Major Crisis

Rebecca E. Przywara, BSN Student Nyack College, NY & Maureen Kroning RN EdD, Associate Professor at Nyack College, NY

maureen.kroning@nyack.edu

Nursing as a practice and profession has experienced significant changes over the years. For instance, in the 1800s nurses were expected to be subservient to doctors. Just hear what the doctor who gave Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduation address: "Every nurse must remember that it is the attending physician's business to make a diagnosis of disease and hence that she should never hazard an opinion herself, under any circumstances." (Dr. Hooker, Springfield Hospital Annual Report, 1894). It would be interesting to know what the nursing faculty were thinking when they heard those words. Thankfully nurses during that era did not take the doctor’s advice and remained dedicated to advance and advocate for the profession of nursing. Around the same time that Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduating class were listening to their graduation address, Florence Nightingale along with other nurse advocates, were making incredible strides to implement nursing education. After the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale recognized and introduced the need for formal nursing education but the education was limited to basic nursing knowledge and skills. As a result of the Women’s Rights Movement in the 1900s, the idea of nursing as a profession evolved into a reality. As society’s healthcare needs changed, nursing education had to change to meet those needs. There were however, challenges each century faced when trying to ensure nursing education met society’s needs and today, the challenges faced are heading right for a major crisis. Cont'd

Disparities in Healthcare: Night Shift Nurses

Skip Morelock PhD, RN, NEA-BC

skpgmor@aol.com

Night shift nurses have been shown more likely to developing health issues than their day shift counterparts. Research over the past twenty years has led to the increasing conclusion that working night shifts for as little as eight shifts a month is associated with an increased likelihood to develop metabolic syndrome, a four-fold increase in the incidence of vascular events, and an increased chanceofdeveloping certain cancers. Cont'd

DNP and the Transformational Leaders

Bo Soobryan

bsoobryan@mail.saintpeters.edu

Transitioning advanced nursing practice to the doctoral level represents the natural evolution of the nursing profession and the right moves to ensure that nurses are prepared for the highest level of practice. Many advocates within the health care community (local and national authorities) are calling and welcoming the DNP role. National and state agencies, as a leading advocate for advanced practice nursing, understands greatly the contributions APNs (advanced practice nurse) make in the health care system as cost-effective providers. In addition, APNs have identified the need for additional education in the areas of evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems management, among others (Kaplan & Brown, 2009). This transition in the education of advanced practice nurses (APNs) is targeted to meet the increasingly complex needs of patients, families, and communities in a rapidly changing health care environment. DNP education also has the potential to transform the nursing profession in a variety of ways. These include: • Creating and adopting new roles in nursing practice • Increasing the influence of APNs in health care and policy development • Promoting leadership by APNs in their workplace and health care organizations • Enhancing the self-concept of advanced practice nurses • Strengthening inter-professional relationships and collaborations. (Kaplan & Brown, 2009; Swider, Levin, Cowell, Breakwell, Holland, & Wallinder, 2009) The DNP stimulates the creation and adoption of new advanced practice role. As health care becomes more complex, it will take such strong leadership criteria for nurses in all fields to continue to improve their own standards and the qualifications of others in the field (Kaplan & Brown, 2009). Cont'd

It is Time to Recruit More Men into the Profession of Nursing

Isaiah Monroe (Nyack College, BSN student) & Maureen Kroning RN EdD (Associate Professor of Nursing, Nyack College, NY)

maureen.kroning@nyack.edu; monroei@nyack.edu

It is a benefit to have men working in the profession of nursing. We need to recruit more men into our nursing schools and to work in our healthcare institutions. Both male and female nurses bring different perspectives and benefits to the profession of nursing and to the patient’s they care for. The ability of men to negotiate and obtain higher salaries and positions in both administration and nursing specialty areas may serve as the impetus to elevate the entire nursing profession. Cont'd

Managing behavior in children with ASD

Karen Regan

karen.regan@childrenscolorado.org

Unfortunately, many of these children end up in the emergency department for these behaviors due to the lack of community mental health services. These crises visits often times result in unnecessary medications being prescribed for these problematic behaviors. Cont'd

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